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Posts Tagged ‘Thanksgiving leftovers’

  1. Turkey Croquettes (AKA Demon Balls AKA Amazing Poultry Balls of Wonder)

    December 1, 2012 by admin

    Croquettes (aka Demon Balls)

    I’ll tell you straight up with this recipe: It’s a pain in the ass. And it’s worth it. But it’s a pain. If you’re pretty confident in the kitchen, then I think you can handle it, but you’ll probably want to drink wine while making it if you get annoyed by a lot of steps or are easily panicked. And if you’re drinking lots of wine when making this (like I am sometimes guilty of) then you should probably have someone else do the frying, as long as it’s not your senile grandma.

    These are terrific. It’s an old school recipe from The Joy of Cooking, and it’s sort of like eating deep fried creamy comfort. Or a deep fried pot pie. I make this every Thanksgiving or Christmas with leftover  turkey, but I’ve also made it with rotisserie chicken. Not for the faint of heart, but whoever you feed this to will probably fall a little bit in love with your ability to comfort. Fair warning: they may want to suckle you afterward. Depending on who wants to suckle and just exactly WHAT they want to suckle, will determine if this is a good thing or not.

    And now…The Recipe From HELL. (But a delicious HELL.)

    You will need to make this recipe in steps:

    1. Prepare the turkey
    2. Prep the binding sauce
    3. Mix turkey and sauce
    4. Chill
    5. Shape your balls
    6. Fry

    5.0 from 1 reviews
    Turkey Croquettes
    Author: 
    Recipe type: Main Dish
    Prep time: 
    Cook time: 
    Total time: 
    Serves: 4
     
    First prep the turkey, then fold in the Veloute sauce.
    Ingredients
    • Veloute Sauce (prepared separately)
    • 2½ cups chopped, skinless cooked turkey or chicken
    • ¼ cup chopped parsley
    • ½ teaspoon dried thyme
    • ⅛ teaspoon nutmeg
    • salt and pepper to taste
    • 1½ cups panko bread crumbs
    • ½ cup flour
    • 2 eggs
    Instructions
    1. Pulse poultry in a food processor a few times until nice and small. Toss with seasonings in a bowl and set aside.
    2. Prepare Veloute sauce. Recipe to follow. Fold Veloute sauce into turkey mixture.
    3. Cover with plastic wrap, placing top of plastic wrap directly on mixture to prevent a skin from forming.
    4. Chill until cold and firm, at least two hours.
    5. Drop ¼ cup croqutte mixture in flour, roll. Drop into egg. Roll. Drop into panko breadcrumbs. Roll.
    6. Fry croquettes until golden brown.

     

    For the Veloute Sauce (Binding Sauce)

    1 Tablespoon butter

    1 cup minced onions (use food processor)

    2 tablespoons butter

    2 tablespoons flour

    1 1/4 cup chicken stock

     

    1. Slowly cook onions in 1 tablespoon butter until nice and golden. Set aside.

    2. In separate pan, melt butter and stir in flour and cook for 5-6 minutes on low heat, until it starts to get golden and you have this rich smell wafting toward you.

    3. Add in stock, whisking constantly. Cook over medium-low heat until it is thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. The recipe says this will take about 20 minutes, but I never know how long it takes because I’m too busy being annoyed and waiting for the sauce to thicken. It will thicken though.

    4. Once thick, add in your onions and cook one minute.

    5. Add into your turkey mixture and chill.

     

    So what does this all look like in pictures? It looks like a nightmare, but here are the steps in Technicolor:

     

    A food processor will save you a lot of work. Just put your chicken in…

    …and PULSE until it looks like this. I then rinse it out and do the same things to the onions and set aside.

    Add your seasonings. I ran out of parsley. Boo. 🙁

    Set the turkey mixture aside and work on your roux. First, butter and flour and whisk like you’ve got a terrible itch…

     

    It’ll start to get all bubbly. Keep whisking. That itch doesn’t go away until it all settles down, relaxes, and you start to smell the faint aroma of browned butter. Sadly, this doesn’t happen if you’re scratching an actual itch.

     

    Then add in your broth and keep whisking and stirring until it’s nice and thick. Then add your cooked onions. Then combine it with your turkey mixture. Your sauce will look thick and luscious like this.

     

    Mix it all up, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate and go do something for a couple of hours. (At this point, you could also add a little milk to the mixture, toss with pasta and add some crunchy topping and cook for a tettrazini type thing.)

     

    Now the fun part. Shaping your balls. I wear gloves. I ALWAYS wear gloves when I touch balls because, ew. Balls.

    Roll ball in flour. Use a bigger bowl then I did, or you’ll hate yourself.

    Roll floured ball in egg. It starts to get slimy and just plain weird. Don’t think about it. Just keep going. Hold your breath if you need to. This part will be over soon.

     

    Blanket those puppies in a comforting layer of Panko.

    See! They’re only slightly misshapen. You can start breathing again.

     

    I like to fry two practice mini-balls. Then you can taste them and make sure you won’t kill anyone by serving them this. (And you can fit two in your mouth, but let them cool first.)

    Coquettes are in the Fire Pit Of Hot Oil. Don’t cook too many at a time. You will anger the Gods.

     

    And here they are! Golden brown!! Serve with cranberry sauce or gravy, or just on their own. I didn’t actually eat the spinach. That was just to add color. They really are terrific, and people will be impressed by your kitchen prowess. Or finesse. Or whatever. They’ll be eating warm, creamy delicious balls that are so gold they’re called CROQUETTES.